Latest Tweets:

Super Mario Bros Theme Song on Wine Glasses and a Frying Pan (슈퍼 마리오 브라더스 - スーパーマリオブラザーズ - 超級瑪莉)

Check out the Giant Malaysian Katydid (Macrolyristes corporalis)! This is one of the largest insects in the world, with their bodies growing to 15 cm (6 inches) long with a 25 cm (10 inch) long wingspan. Though the last thing you want to hear is that this giant insect is carnivorous, they pose absolutely no threat to humans (aside from haunting your dreams, of course).  Relatively speaking, the males of this species have the largest testes of any known animal at 14% of their body weight. If humans had the same ratio, a 91 kg (200 lb) man would have testes that weighed nearly 13 kgs (28 lbs)!


Check out the Giant Malaysian Katydid (Macrolyristes corporalis)! This is one of the largest insects in the world, with their bodies growing to 15 cm (6 inches) long with a 25 cm (10 inch) long wingspan. Though the last thing you want to hear is that this giant insect is carnivorous, they pose absolutely no threat to humans (aside from haunting your dreams, of course).

Relatively speaking, the males of this species have the largest testes of any known animal at 14% of their body weight. If humans had the same ratio, a 91 kg (200 lb) man would have testes that weighed nearly 13 kgs (28 lbs)!

*2
This is a piece of the Fukang meteorite, a 1,003 kilogram meteorite discovered near the Chinese city of Fukang.  It is a pallasite, a type of stony–iron meteorite, with olivine crystals throughout. Only about 1% of all meteorites are pallasites, and this one is believed to originate from deep inside intact meteors created during the formation of the solar system about 4.5 billion years ago More info and photos: http://bit.ly/GVjC3s


This is a piece of the Fukang meteorite, a 1,003 kilogram meteorite discovered near the Chinese city of Fukang.

It is a pallasite, a type of stony–iron meteorite, with olivine crystals throughout. Only about 1% of all meteorites are pallasites, and this one is believed to originate from deep inside intact meteors created during the formation of the solar system about 4.5 billion years ago

More info and photos: http://bit.ly/GVjC3s

*5
This beautiful creature is a Cyerce nigricans, a nudibranch that lives in Indo-West Pacific waters. Its bright colors warns predators that they should stay away, as it produces disgusting secretions as a defense mechanisms. If a predator decides it wants to try and eat it anyway, the leafy cerata that cover its back can easily be cast off, allowing it to escape. Photo credit: Kevin Lee http://bit.ly/1l8JKFY

This beautiful creature is a Cyerce nigricans, a nudibranch that lives in Indo-West Pacific waters. Its bright colors warns predators that they should stay away, as it produces disgusting secretions as a defense mechanisms. If a predator decides it wants to try and eat it anyway, the leafy cerata that cover its back can easily be cast off, allowing it to escape.

Photo credit: Kevin Lee http://bit.ly/1l8JKFY

This beauty is a polychaete worm. It belongs to a class of annelids that have been on this planet for about 530 million years (over 200 million years longer than trees). There are over 10,000 species of polychaetes and can live in some of the most extreme environments on Earth, from the coldest parts of the ocean to the hottest, right near hydrothermal vents. Photo credit: Crassous/SPL/Barcroft

This beauty is a polychaete worm. It belongs to a class of annelids that have been on this planet for about 530 million years (over 200 million years longer than trees). There are over 10,000 species of polychaetes and can live in some of the most extreme environments on Earth, from the coldest parts of the ocean to the hottest, right near hydrothermal vents.

Photo credit: Crassous/SPL/Barcroft

When eels are babies, they look like they are made of glass! This appearance comes as the eels transition between the larval and the juvenile stage of life when they reach full pigmentation.  Over the last 30 years, there has been a decline in glass eels which has affected their availability as a food item in Europe. The most likely culprit is a parasitic nematode which originated in Asia and spread due to trade. The worms can interfere with the swim bladder’s function, making it difficult for the eels to swim. Image credits: Under the Vast Blue Seas (top, middle), Jordan Colosi (bottom)

When eels are babies, they look like they are made of glass! This appearance comes as the eels transition between the larval and the juvenile stage of life when they reach full pigmentation.

Over the last 30 years, there has been a decline in glass eels which has affected their availability as a food item in Europe. The most likely culprit is a parasitic nematode which originated in Asia and spread due to trade. The worms can interfere with the swim bladder’s function, making it difficult for the eels to swim.

Image credits: Under the Vast Blue Seas (top, middle), Jordan Colosi (bottom)

*3
*2

This is Glaucus atlanticus, a sea slug found in tropical and temperate waters throughout the world. These photographs make the rounds on Facebook every few months simply because they’re so strangely beautiful.
However, no one ever mentions that this sea slug (like other sea slugs) is a total badass. Why, you ask? It eats incredibly venomous animals like the Portuguese Man o’ War. The sting is agonizingly painful to a human and to most animals, but poses no problem to Glaucus atlanticus, which is immune. After the sea slug has consumed the Portuguese Man o’ War it “selects” the most venomous cells for its own use. The slug then incorporates these cells into its own tissues, and uses them as a defense mechanism. It also concentrates the venom, making it far more venomous than the animal it “stole” the cells from.

This is Glaucus atlanticus, a sea slug found in tropical and temperate waters throughout the world. These photographs make the rounds on Facebook every few months simply because they’re so strangely beautiful.

However, no one ever mentions that this sea slug (like other sea slugs) is a total badass. Why, you ask? It eats incredibly venomous animals like the Portuguese Man o’ War. The sting is agonizingly painful to a human and to most animals, but poses no problem to Glaucus atlanticus, which is immune. After the sea slug has consumed the Portuguese Man o’ War it “selects” the most venomous cells for its own use. The slug then incorporates these cells into its own tissues, and uses them as a defense mechanism. It also concentrates the venom, making it far more venomous than the animal it “stole” the cells from.